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Alan Chvotkin of Professional Services Council: Penalizing the Unsuspecting One Offeror

Jeff Brody
Alan Chvotkin

Federal agencies have long been troubled with what to do when there is an expectation that multiple proposals will be submitted in response to a solicitation but only one offer is actually received. New rules changes, and other policy changes, impose significant new burdens on the bidder who, while anticipating a competition, finds itself as the only qualified offeror. But why penalize that one offeror, as these changes do? Alan Chvotkin, Executive Vice President and Counsel of the Professional Services Council, answers that question.

To read Chvotkin’s article in full, please click here

About Alan Chvotkin

Alan Chvotkin has served as the executive vice president and counsel for the Professional Services Council since 2001 and is responsible for the association’s legislative and regulatory policy activity. Prior to joining PSC, Chvotkin was vice president of Government Services for AT&T. He also served as the corporate director of government relations and senior counsel with the Sundstrand Corporation. He also has 13 years experience as a professional staff member on Capitol Hill and served on the Senate Budget Committee and the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee.

Currently, Chvotkin is a member of the American, Supreme Court and the District of Columbia Bar Associations. He serves as a fellow and member of the national board of advisors for the National Contract Management Association. He co-chairs the operating committee of the Council of Defense and Space Industries Association. Chvotkin also is a founding member and a continuing leader of the federal contracting industry’s Acquisition Reform Working Group.

Chvotkin graduated from American University with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and a master’s degree in Public Administration. He also earned a law degree from American University’s Washington College of Law.

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