Gigamon’s Dennis Reilly: Tech, Processes, Workforce Key to Gov’t Cyber Defense Efforts

Dennis Reilly

Dennis Reilly, vice president of federal sales at Gigamon, has said government agencies should have the right balance of technology, people and processes to defend and protect their information technology systems from cyber threats.

Reilly wrote that one of the difficult challenges facing agencies is recruiting and retaining cybersecurity professionals.

“Therefore, agencies must equip employees with the latest technology and automate lower-value tasks so that cybersecurity professionals can do the high-value activities and strategic thinking necessary to stay ahead of adversaries,” he said.

Reilly discussed the potential role of orchestration and automation in efforts to handle large volumes of threat indicators and speed up detection of cyber vulnerabilities.

He also mentioned the intelligence community’s Sharkseer program and how it works to expedite threat detection and response through the use of automation, orchestration, anti-malware, commercial threat intelligence and other cyber platforms.

Reilly cited how agencies could leverage the Modernizing Government Technology Act to support larger projects and advance the Sharkseer initiative via the Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation program of the Department of Homeland Security.

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