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Red Hat’s David Egts: Agencies Should Adopt New Toolkits to Harness the Power of AI

Dave Egts

David Egts, chief technologist for the North American public sector at Red Hat (NYSE: RHT), has said there are several tools that could help government agencies facilitate the adoption of artificial intelligence.

Those include AI toolkits such as TensorFlow open-source software, predictive analytics tools like Red Hat Insights and AI-based digital assistants such as Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home, Egts wrote.

“Purpose-built AI toolkits enable non-AI specialists to use the technology without needing to write, or deeply understand, the underlying code,” he noted.

He called on agency leaders to implement “low- and no-cost AI courses and tutorials that make the technology easy to understand” as well as provide employees the leeway to experiment and identify a business-driven problem that could be potentially addressed by AI.

Egts said agencies should consider exit costs as part of their cloud strategies as well as portability as they develop cloud-native applications.

“AI advancements and services in the cloud are evolving at a breakneck pace, which means your cloud provider of choice today might not be your provider of choice tomorrow — or years from now. Therefore, agency applications should be built on open substrates and backed by a hybrid cloud strategy so that they can be moved between cloud providers,” he added.

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