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Hortonworks’ Shaun Bierweiler: Open Source Enables Control of Costs, Risks in Tech Development

Shaun Bierweiler

TYSONS CORNER, VA, June 26, 2018 — Shaun Bierweiler, vice president of Hortonworks‘ (Nasdaq: HDP) U.S. public sector business, has said an open approach will help control costs and time spent on technology development operations in the big data space, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

He said in an interview published June 19 the open source model will also enable developers to identify defects in software earlier and address them more quickly than they could when using proprietary alternatives.

Bierweiler also noted the need to check the source of the code in free and open source software as well as the development process it went through before integrating such components into an organization’s network.

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