Air Force Issues Draft Solicitation for $4.5B Special Access Programs Support Contract

Jeff Brody

The U.S. Air Force released a draft request for proposals for a potential $4.5B contract for cybersecurity and physical security services in support of the service’s Special Access Programs, Bloomberg Government reported Wednesday.

The SAP Security Support Services program may require 1K or more full-time employees and serves as a follow-on to a security services contract with ManTech International (Nasdaq: MANT).

SAPs, also known as “black programs,” could be in the form of classified acquisition initiatives or covert intelligence or military operations.

The chosen contractor will help implement security protocols to safeguard advanced technology programs, provide logistics and communications security support for SAP activities and facilities, conduct information security operations and perform counterintelligence training, analysis and investigations, among other responsibilities.

The Air Force will accept comments on the draft RFP through June 12 and host an industry day for the SAP SSS program from June 24 to 26.

The service intends to issue the final solicitation on Aug. 8 and award the contract by December 2020 and expects work to commence by March 2021.

You may also be interested in...

Lynn Bamford President Curtiss-Wright segments

Lynn Bamford to Succeed David Adams as Curtiss-Wright CEO

Curtiss-Wright (NYSE: CW) plans to appoint Lynn Bamford, president of its defense and power segments, to become the corporation's president and CEO. She would succeed David Adams who plans to retire on Jan. 1, concluding the latter's seven-year tenure as CEO and over two decades of service with the company, Curtiss-Wright said Thursday.

John Ratcliffe Director ODNI

ODNI to Increase China Intell Spending by Nearly 20%; John Ratcliffe Quoted

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence said in a statement Thursday it has shifted resources in its fiscal year 2021 budget to increase intelligence spending on China by nearly 20 percent to help address concerns over economic, counterintelligence and national security threat posed by the East Asian country, The Wall Street Journal reported.