McAleese and Associates: DoD’s Ellen Lord Talks Software Development, Cybersecurity at Meeting

Jim McAleese

McAleese & Associates has released a report on key takeaways from the remarks of Ellen Lord, defense undersecretary for acquisition and sustainment, at a Defense Innovation Board meeting.

Lord, a 2019 Wash100 recipient, discussed the need to bifurcate software development from hardware development and cited the Department of Defense’s effort to rewrite the 5000.02 acquisition directive to meet that need, Jim McAleese, founder and principal at McAleese & Associates and a 2019 Wash100 winner, wrote in the report.

Ellen Lord

“We are rewriting DoD instruction 5000.02 this year … We are going to have one process for hardware and one process for software because truly I believe, our future warfighting capability depends on hardware-enabled and software-defined warfighting systems,” Lord said at the DIB meeting held Thursday in Washington, D.C.

She touched upon the Agile DevOps approach to software development and the Pentagon’s intent to request the inclusion of a new authority and funding in the fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act for software DevOps.

Other issues Lord discussed at the DIB meeting include the need for DoD to build up cybersecurity to counter data exfiltration of controlled unclassified information; the Pentagon’s effort to establish pathfinder DevSecOps projects for small subcontractors; 5G network security; and hardened containers in a government cloud.

Lord also discussed some of DoD’s priority programs, including the F-35 fighter aircraft and the nuclear triad recapitalization effort, according to the report.

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