Marillyn Hewson: Lockheed Makes Federal Health IT Play With Buy of Systems Made Simple

Marillyn Hewson
Marillyn Hewson

Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) has agreed to acquire Syracuse, New York-based health information technology services contractor Systems Made Simple for an undisclosed sum in a push to expand offerings in the federal health IT market.

The companies expect to close the deal within 30 days and Systems Made Simple will be a part of Lockheed’s information systems and global solutions business area, Lockheed said Wednesday.

Systems Made Simple holds a position on the Department of Veterans Affairs‘ T4 contract vehicle for IT modernization efforts and works with the VA on areas such as health data analytics, health data management and health system interoperability.

“Technology is rapidly transforming the healthcare landscape in the United States, and is critical to reducing costs and improving patient care, ” said Marillyn Hewson, Lockheed chairman, president and CEO.

“Systems Made Simple’s capabilities in engineering health technology solutions are a natural extension of our existing health IT portfolio, and will enable us to deliver a broader portfolio of capabilities to meet our healthcare customers’ current and future needs, ” Hewson said.

More than 500 employees work for Systems Made Simple across offices in McLean and Charlottesville, Virginia; Salt Lake City; Tampa, Florida; and Austin, Texas.

Lockheed provides veteran disability case management services to the VA.

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